Photography is in the details

When I first began my career as a professional photographer I was blessed to have Nick Adams for a photo editor. I learned a lot from Nick, way more than I could ever relate in a single blog post, but one of the little tidbits of wisdom I recall Nick relating to me one day was just how important he felt the details could be.

Leeds, Utah - Civilian Conservation Corps camp
Leeds, Utah – Civilian Conservation Corps camp

I don’t mean the details of photography like f-stops and shutter speeds, I mean the details of the world around us. Sometimes, getting up close, focusing on a small part of a subject, can tell you way more than a wide shot taken from far away that shows a building, a mountain or a person from head to toe.

Taking time to notice the details and to share them with your viewers is important. There’s lots to learn from the details. You can see the weathered paint flaking off of the door frame. You can almost feel the roughness of the rocks that make up the walls of the building.

Leeds, Utah - Civilian Conservation Corps camp
Leeds, Utah – Civilian Conservation Corps camp

The photo of the door knob at the Civilian Conservation Corps camp in Leeds is one of my favorite shots from that trip. And I think it might tell you more about the camp than the wider shots.

So I try to notice the details, I try to get close. I try to find something interesting where others might never look. I try to help my viewers discover a different way of seeing the world.